Save 10% on All Dakota Saxophones Coupon Code D10 at Check Out

Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
  • Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
  • Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
  • Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
  • Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
  • Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
  • Sax Dakota USA SDAS-1020 Professional Straight Alto Saxophone
Free Shipping!
Retail: $3,875.00
Price: $3,000.00
You Save: $875.00 (22.6%)
    Availability: In Stock
    Usually ships In 1-2 Business Days

    Quantity:
    Adolph Sax invented saxophones that were only straight. Years later, they were 're-shaped' for ease of performance. This Straight Alto sax is the finest modern version of what Adolph designed over 100 years ago. Solid Stainless Steel rods guarantee fast/secure key pad closure. Double key arms enhance the smooth action of all keys and tables. This is a new beginning for players who want their own identity in sound, performance and recognition. Available only in Gray Onyx.
    • Rose Brass Body, Bow, Bell, and Neck
    • Gray Onyx Plated Neck, Body, and Bow
    • Matte Silver Plated Keys, Guards, and Trim
    • Over Sized Bell - For a BIG large sound and an extra kick on those roaring low notes
    • Blue Steel Needle Springs
    • Front F Key
    • High F# Key
    • Tilting Spatula Keys - For smoother easier playing of the bell notes
    • Tapered Pivot Screws
    • Genuine Mother of Pearl Key Pearls
    • Hand Engraving
    • Ergonomic Key Design
    • Adjustment Screws on Vital Key Areas - To keep the sax playing as good as it looks
    • Case is solid wood construction, with Russet Brown leather type trim, Tan custom tweed covering and brass hardware.

    The Manufacturer warranties this item for

    Five Years from Date of Purchase on All Parts And Labor

    and

    Six Months from Date of Purchase on the finish

    The Sax Dakota USA Test Drive


    When you purchase any brand new Sax Dakota USA Saxophone from Hornsales.com, keep it for 10 days. Play it in the studio, on the stage, in your house, or any place the music takes you. If your are not completely satisfied with you new saxophone, you can return it for a full refund.

    Terms and Conditions

    Customer is responsible for return shipping costs.
    Item must be returned in BRAND NEW condition with all included accessories and packaging.
    If item is damaged or parts are missing , the cost of repair or replacement will be deducted from customer payment.
    Refunds will be processed within 1 business week of receipt of product by Hornsales.com

    Mr. LaPlaca sent jazz.com two horns for review: the SDA-1000 standard curved alto, and the SDAS-1020 straight alto. The horns' retro-styled hard wood cases are covered in khaki-colored tweed, with dark red leather-textured rubber trim, and brass hardware. The straight horn's case is necessarily of an odd size; long and narrow, it resembles a bass clarinet case. Both cases are lined with plush burgundy velour. The curved alto gets its own blanket attached to the interior, which lends added protection when the case is closed. Both cases are rather heavy and uncomfortable to carry, but look to be plenty sturdy and should provide ample protection.

    The horns are exceptionally well constructed and designed. Both have a hand-finished, fast-tapered neck, a body made of 77% copper content brass alloy, with black oxide steel needle springs and pivot screws. The pads are made of soft merino leather with hardened tone boosters. The keys in the lower register feature double arms, the better to insure proper response. Key rods are made out of solid nickel silver, and the octave key stop is made out of solid brass, as opposed to the cork used on most horns a simple but very nice touch. The horn has precision adjustment screws from top to bottom, which presumably makes it receptive to extreme fine-tuning.

    I tested the horns over a period of several weeks, privately and in an ensemble setting. I used a Runyon 7 mouthpiece (orange, if you're interested) with the "Spoiler" insert. Like most new horns out of the box, the action on both was extremely high much higher than I prefer. After a few hours, however, I was able to adjust, making evaluation a fairly simple matter.

    The first thing I noticed (after the horns' striking appearance) was their heft; they are both heavy, substantial instruments. The action is extremely smooth and tight. Of particular note are the left hand table keys, which depress easily with a minimum of stretch and strain on the pinky no trivial matter for someone (like myself) with small hands. The key cups are shallow, requiring the use of a thin pad. As a result, the act of depressing a key results in a distinct and nearly audible "pop." Work the keys without blowing air and the horn feels almost like a set of tuned bongos. There is little ambiguity when fingering a note; once played, it's played, and all the better to unite tongue and fingers. The horns blow extremely free and easy from top to bottom. The highs blow without unwelcome resistance; the lows speak as loud or soft as required. As far as intonation, both horns play in-tune as well as any saxophone I've ever played.

    It's in the character of tone that the two horns differ most noticeably from one another. The curved SDA-1000 produces a strong, cutting tone (emphasized by my mouthpiece, which emphasizes the sound's upper partials ... and if you've read this far, I can assume you know what "upper partials" means). By my reckoning, it would be well suited for anything jazz-, rock-, or R&B-related.

    In contrast, the straight SDAS-1020 produces an equally strong but somewhat rounder, more focused tone a trifle dark and less overtone-laden. The fact that the sound is directed nearer the floor enhances the darkening effect. Playing it in a session with a bassist and drummer, it seemed strange to have the sound emanate so far from my ears, yet I got accustomed to it in short order. In fact, as someone whose primary instrument is a straight soprano, the SDAS-1020 was something of a revelation. It felt like a slightly fatter, longer version of my Yamaha YSS-675. Going back and forth from soprano to alto has always presented me with difficulties in terms of feel. Those difficulties are much less pronounced with the SDAS-1020. I'm sure I'd play a great deal more alto if I owned this horn.

    I have only two small quibbles. First, the mother-of-pearl key inlays are a bit flat for my taste. I would prefer that they be more contoured. Second, the high F# key occasionally gets in the way of smooth fingering in the right handa problem hardly unique to this brand. About the only other problem I can imagine anyone having might have to do with the horns' "futuristic" appearance. A traditionalist might prefer a plainer instrument. The SDA-1000 comes in three different finishes, none of them remotely "plain" (the SDAS-1020 comes in Gray Onyx, only). Other than that, there's nothing not to love. Even the price is right: the SDA-1000's suggested retail price is $2,950, and the SDAS-1020 lists for $3,700 quite affordable when compared to costlier products from such competitors as Selmer, Yamaha, and Keilwerth.

    Ultimately, Mr. LaPlaca's decision to design such a distinctive horn could prove to be a savvy move. Rather than reinvent the wheel and manufacture a great horn that looked like all the other great horns, he's devised one that's utterly unique. If Sax Dakota takes its place as one of the elite brands (and there's no reason why it shouldn't, it's that good an instrument), perhaps its style will be a template for others to emulate: a cool, sophisticated gadget that speaks to both the 11 year-old and fine artist in every saxophonist.

    Chris Kelsey

    Click the playlist drop down to hear more artists performing on Sax Dakota Saxophones

    Overall Customer Rating of 13 Reviews:

    Dakota straight alto

    Rating:
    Pros:
    Cons:
    <p>I purchased this horn for my sax player who used it for the first time at a small venue. We found that the downward projection of sound of which we were a bit wary, turned out to be a plus in that he did not need a microphone to project a nice throaty sound in the low registers which was heard throughout while at the same time achieving a pleasantly brighter sound in the super high registers without being "rowdy". We paired it with a Theo Wanne Durga mouthpiece with excellent results. A truly fine piece of workmanship. The G was sticking a bit which was rectified easily with cork grease.</p>

    Best Price

    Rating:
    Pros:
    Cons:
    The 10% off coupon makes Hornsales.com the best price anywhere for Dakota saxophones. Great Service, fast shipping.

    Fast Shipping

    Rating:
    Pros:
    Cons:
    Order on Sunday night and received it on Tuesday. That's Fast shipping for Free Shipping. Very Impressed with Hornsales. My New Sax Dakota Tenor looks and plays perfect

    Demo Model as good as a New one

    Rating:
    Pros:
    Cons:
    I purchased a Demo model from Hornsales.com at a huge savings. It is suppose to have something wrong with the finish, but I can not find anything wrong with the finish. All eh pads seal, and everything is perfect. I even called them to make sure they sent me the right sax. This was an incredible deal, Thanks Hornsales.

    Great Service

    Rating:
    Pros:
    Cons:
    I purchased a Sax Dakota form Hornsales.com because there were no local dealers in my area. When I received my saxophone it had several issues not caused by shipping. There were intonation issues, keys not closing properly and it was barely playable. I was horrified. I immediately contacted Hornsales.com. They contacted Sax Dakota who sent be a call ticket for UPS and sent me another sax out. This one arrived perfectly and had no issues. I am very happy with my Sax Dakota and with Hornsales.com